Licensure Reciprocity

Expanding the Pool of Teachers Policy

Licensure Reciprocity

The state should help to make licenses fully portable among states, with appropriate safeguards.

Best practices

Alabama and Texas appropriately support licensure reciprocity by only requiring certified teachers from other states to meet Alabama's and Texas's own testing requirements and by not specifying any additional coursework or recency requirements to determine eligibility for either traditional or alternate route teachers. 

Suggested Citation:
National Council on Teacher Quality. (2011). Licensure Reciprocity national results. State Teacher Policy Database. [Data set].
Retrieved from: https://www.nctq.org/yearbook/national/Licensure-Reciprocity-7
Best practice 2

States

Meets goal 0

States

Nearly meets goal 3

States

Meets goal in part 13

States

Meets a small part of goal 15

States

Does not meet goal 18

States

Do states require all out-of-state teachers to pass in-state licensure tests to receive licensure?

2011
Figure details

Yes: AK, AL, ID, IL, MA, MN, ND, NY, OH, PA, SD, TX, UT, WA, WI

No: AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, IA, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, ME, MI, MO, MS, MT, NC, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NV, OK, OR, RI, SC, TN, VA, VT, WV, WY

Footnotes
MT: No subject-matter testing for any teacher certification.
NE: No subject-matter testing for any teacher certification.
NY: Exception for teachers with National Board Certification.
PA: Exception for teachers with National Board Certification.
WA: Exception for teachers with National Board Certification.

Do states treat out-of-state teachers equally regardless of whether they were prepared in a traditional or an alternate route program?

2011
Figure details

Yes. State treats out-of-state teachers equally regardless of preparation type. : AL, DE, GA, NC, TX, WV

Partially. State maintains policies that have the potential to create obstacles for teachers prepared through alternate routes. : CA, KS, NY, RI, WA, WY

No. State maintains specific and distinct requirements for teachers prepared through alternate routes. : AK, AR, AZ, CO, CT, DC, FL, HI, IA, ID, IL, IN, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, MT, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NV, OH, OK, OR, PA, SC, SD, TN, UT, VA, VT, WI

Footnotes
RI: For traditionally trained teachers only.
WA: Transcript review required for those with less than 3 years experience.
WY: For traditionally trained teachers only.

Research rationale

Many professions have gone further than teaching in encouraging interstate mobility. The requirements for attorneys, for example, are complicated, but often offer certain kinds of flexibility, such as allowing them to answer a small set of additional questions. See the Comprehensive Guide to Bar Admissions Requirements 2007, published by the National Conference of Bar Examiners and the American Bar Association, available at:
http://www.ncbex.org/ .

On the similarity in effectiveness between graduates of traditional and alternative programs, see  J. Constantine, D. Player, T. Silva, K. Hallgren, M. Grider, and J. Deke, An Evaluation of Teachers Trained Through Different Routes to Certification, Final Report. National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Services, U.S. Department of Education (2009), D. Boyd, et al. "How Changes in Entry Requirements Alter the Teacher Workforce and Affect Student Achievement." Education Finance and Policy, (2006).  T. Kane, J. Rockoff, and D. Staiger. "What Does Certification Tell Us About Teacher Effectiveness? Evidence from New York City." National Bureau of Economic Research. (2006), G. Henry and C. Thompson, "Impacts of Teacher Preparation on Student Test Scores in North Carolina." Teacher Portals. University of North Carolina (2010). Z.Xu, J. Hannaway and C. Taylor, "Making a Difference? The Effects of Teach for America in High School." The Urban Institute/Calder. (2009), D. Boyd et al "Recruiting Effective Math Teachers, How Do Math Immersion Teachers Compare? Evidence from New York City." Calder Institute (2009); as well as "How Changes in Entry Requirements Alter the Teacher Workforce and Affect Student Achievement," by Donald Boyd, Pamela Grossman, Hamilton Lankford, Susanna Loeb, and James Wyckoff, National Bureau of Economic Research, December 2005; and "The Effects of Teach For America on Students: Findings from a National Evaluation," (Mathematica Policy Research Inc., 2004).

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