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State governments reign over the teaching profession

State governments are arguably the most powerful authority over the teaching profession. Since 2007, NCTQ has tracked and analyzed teacher policies across all 50 states and the District of Columbia in our State Teacher Policy Yearbook. The Yearbook presents the most detailed analysis available of each state's performance against, and progress toward, a set of specific, research-based teacher policy goals aimed at helping states build a comprehensive policy framework in support of teacher effectiveness.

The State Teacher Policy Yearbook

summarizes how the states are doing in developing policies that improve the teaching profession.
The 2015 State Teacher Policy Yearbook provides a 360-degree analysis of every state law, rule and regulation that shapes the teaching profession—from teacher preparation, licensing and evaluation to compensation, professional development and dismissal policy.

Use the National Findings and State Findings tabs below to view national trends and in-depth state analyses by policy area, respectively.

State-by-State Summary

In December 2015, NCTQ released a new comprehensive edition of the Yearbook, including all aspects of state teacher policy. Get info across all 50 states and DC on what states are doing to support effective teaching.
 

Policy Issues Overview

Understand the Policy Issues and the current state of the country in these areas. This is the basis for the annual State Teacher Policy Yearbook. NCTQ tracks and analyzes regulations and legislation that shape the teaching profession in all 50 states and the District of Columbia across six policy areas: teacher preparation, evaluation, tenure, dismissal and LIFO, compensation and pensions.
 

Teacher Pensions | State Policy Issues

In 2015 teacher pension systems had a total of a half trillion dollars in unfunded liabilities — a debt load that climbed more than $100 billion in just the last two years. Across the states, an average of 70 cents of every dollar contributed to state teacher pension systems goes toward paying off the ever-increasing pension debt, not to future teacher benefits. How is your state doing?